January 2010 Archives

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Image and Picture and Image

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The internet is a good way to virtually visit the Tate Museum and see a picture of Richard Wright's Turner-prize-winning fresco – an "exquisite abstract work in gold leaf" that, like a performance, wowed its audience and then... was gone.

In interviews, Wright describedthe fact that he developed the picture over time from an idea he called a "fragment" of the final fresco's appearance; but it is also said that a goal of Wright's "art work" is for it to live in the memory of the audience. This means that the fresco, in Wright's approach, is not finished by Wright but instead by the audience -- as the memory itself is, in effect, the target work product that is achieved.

For each individual viewer, what's at stake is the relationship between the development of the image that was driving Wright to form its fresco corollary, and the the development of the image that is formed through viewer memory. The fresco itself, an intermediary facilitator amongst the two images, is essentially just an instrument -- or perhaps a set of instruments, as it also incorporates its wall and other aspects of its presentation. The Turner prize was not given to the best instrument in the competition, but to the best use of instruments. The complexity of use of the instruments is under pressure to enable the viewer's memory as a reliable mechanism for generating the image that the viewer "keeps". 

The Guardian UK arts report notes that Tate Britain's art handlers sanded and painted over the work at the end of last week.

Essentially, they struck the set, packed the instruments and props into the vans or back storage, leaving the empty stage, and taking nothing away from the facts of the encounters that occurred during the show.

The Meaning of Art

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 All art is work, but not all work is art.

Some work is good to great, other work is not so good and perhaps awful.

All art is work about an idea. Some ideas are interesting or compelling, others not so much.

Most art is never seen by anyone other than the worker.

An idea may have many different kinds of representation, not just a representation as art.

A lot of work is not done for any compensation other than the satisfaction of proving something by doing the work. People by work products because they either appreciate them or they need them. Commercialism and the art markets are not about art, they are about property. But financial support of artists is often nothing significantly different from supporting science or education.

Creativity often leads to no product that anyone other than the worker can call finished. But experiencing, sharing or even just observing creativity is often stimulating or even inspirational. It's also really important to know that the quality of originality may offer nothing sharable or tangible to someone other than the creator; but of course we know that often it does.

The person who is not an artist but who experiences artwork often values their relationship with art more than they value any particular work of art or any particular artist.

Every artist may at any time shift emphasis around amongst the ideas of how to work, what to work with, and why to work, given an idea or discovery revealed by the process itself of working.

People generally do not like to be held accountable for distinguishing their ideas of quality (obtained effects vs. needs), value (what difference it makes and why that matters), importance (how something changes the moment of its occurrence) and competency (ability to execute relative to requirements) -- but those who won't or can't are rarely qualified to talk about art since they can't even talk about the meaning of work.

Structuralism

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(Tiles)

 

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The sudden impact of natural moments is often like a brief excited whisper about a coincidence meeting a plan

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But it seems, invariably, that spending any real time with it turns up epics of architectural history. People are great at simultaneously doing a few big things really fast, shaping forms. Nature, by comparison, is great at simultaneously doing billions of small things slowly, forming shapes.

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Copyright 2010 Malcolm Ryder

A different view

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Old cameras, cheap cameras, one-off cameras... have a way of just doing their thing without any concern for the fussiness that their user might bring to them.This just means that of the number of good pictures they might produce, some were lucky, and some were smart. And some were both. Most likely, the best that it ever got was when someone was smart enough to get lucky. Even with the incredible cameras we can have now, I'm thinking that's still the way things get good. And the flip side of the coin is that any camera can be one you should pick up. There's a website called Junkstorecameras that is kind of about this.

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Zona ......

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(Drawing)

 

Some days it appears as if during the night the lean plants scratch themselves onto the surface of the plain ground and then get caught as they cannot all retreat when the lights come on.

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Zona .....

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(Postcard)

 

Decided to look around but not stay overnight.

 

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This set of pictures, and the entire " 'Zona" series on artdotdot, is dedicated to the artists and travelers Victor Ryder and Annette Malin, of München, the capital city of Bavaria, Germany.

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder

Zona ....

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(Drawings and Postcards)

 

 

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Surveying.

 

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder

Zona ...

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(Postcards)

 

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Lots of things are made from horses. The Ranch exists because horses exist. Some pictures are partially made from horses. Marketers think you can make a ranch from pictures. Wranglers work harder than marketers. 

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder

Zona ..

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(Drawing)

 

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Perseverence is the most important discipline of the desert, and the everyday quiet of the hard light gives no soundtrack to the violence that comes with it. Much of the time it is hard to see anything happening; the proof of both winning and losing is in the etching against the ground and the sky and objects themselves, sometimes coarse, sometimes fine. It all appears only as the light itself offers tolerance.

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder

Zona .

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(Drawings, Posters)

 

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Arizona True Family Ranch; found landscape decor and dress

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder

Zona

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(Scenics)

 

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Arizona, True Family Ranch. The documentary of landscape can have a wide range of agendas. Exploration is one, working to find the features and scale of a landscape's signature. At a quarter mile away from any point, the apparent elements are very few in number and almost without variety across their horizontal spread -- offering little as any pattern or any rhythm of densities. Instead, the key distinctions are nearby eye-level events, and portraiture.

 

Copyright 2009 Malcolm Ryder